Soccer in the Heat

Here are some tips for the players, referees, coaches and cheering section.....
WHEN TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED TO BE IN THE UPPER 90’s AND AVOVE, PLEASE PROTECT YOUR PLAYERS.

THIS IS IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR EVERYONE WHO WILL BE IN THE HEAT....
Coaches, referees, parents, grandparents, etc.


THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO PROTECT PLAYERS FROM THE HEAT IS TO MAKE SURE THEY HYDRATE PROPERLY!

  • Fluids (preferably water!) should be 59-72 degrees for best absorption and cooling affect from the inside out.
  • 8-10 8 oz. glasses of water a day. Start this 2-3 days before tournament.  Urine should be pale or clear.
  • 2 hours before a game = 16-24 oz.
  • 15 min. Before a game = 8-16 oz.
  • 8 oz. of water every 15-20 minutes during the game
  • After the game= 16 oz. until the urine is pale or clear.
  • First hour after the game is prime carbo loading time (sports drink)
  • High carbo meal 1-3 hours after game (bagels, bananas, apple juice, fruit yogurt, pancakes, spaghetti, potatoes, (no fried or fatty foods or too much protein)
  • Sports drinks of less than 7% carbs have shown to enhance glycogen levels in the muscles as well as speed abdominal emptying
  • The latest research indicates that the players that are likely to cramp are sodium depleters, once again a sports drink is appropriate and not salt tablets
  • Warning signs of dehydration a.) dizziness, light-headedness b.) muscle cramps c.) nausea, headache and vomiting d.) cold clammy skin with possible high body temp

Pale face-raise feet; red face-raise head

No sweat – call for medical

  • Drugs can also bring on heat illness a.) anti-psychotic drugs for depression or b.) antihistamines and decongestants c.) alcohol d.) asthma medications e.) all caffeine drinks or pills= red bull, tea, coffee, cokes.  Keep the kids away from caffeine!
  • There is a rare condition that is observed from drinking too much.  Brain swells and it can be deadly.  Follow guidelines and you shouldn’t have any problems. 
  • If a player does experience heat illness then they will be more prone to have heat problems in the near future.  They must be watched closely. 

      

Cool Out - Playing Safely in the Sun

While not contributing to joint problems, vigorous exercise in the sun and heat can lead to other types of injuries and, in the worst cases, even death.  Playing rigorous sports in the heat requires close monitoring of both body and weather conditions.
Heat-related illnesses include:

  • Dehydration -- deficit in body fluids
  • Heat exhaustion -- nausea, dizziness, weakness, headache, pale and moist skin, heavy perspiration, normal or low body temperature, weak pulse, dilated pupils, disorientation, fainting spells
  • Heat stroke -- headache, dizziness, confusion, and hot dry skin, possibly leading to vascular collapse, coma, and death.

Take the following simple steps to have fun in the sun:

  • Use sunscreen and a hat (where possible) to reduce the chance of sunburn (and developing various skin cancers that can occur later in life).
  • Respond quickly if heat-related injuries occur.
  • Schedule regular fluid breaks during practice and games.  Kids need to drink at least eight ounces of fluid every 20 minutes.
  • Drink plenty of water (best choice).  Other options are fruit juices and sports drinks.
  • Drink more fluids after playing.
  • Make player substitutions more frequently in the heat.
  • Wear light-colored, "breathable" clothing.
  • Use misting water sprays on the body to keep cool.